Chromatic Aberration Reduction

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    Marco Marrocco

    For me, it's a matter of having more choices: many people work exclusively with RAW images, and so do I most of the time, but there are some occasions when I know I'm shooting with a lens that will result in an intrusive amount of CA/distortion. If that's the case I'd rather do some preliminary cleanup outside of Aurora, usually something tailored to the profile of the lens in question. Of course if I do that there's no reason to apply the CA correction a second time.

    It's a bit of a tradeoff: this way I'm losing some of the extended information from the RAW images in exchange for a set of cleaner TIFFs I can use as a starting point in Aurora.

    Kindest regards,

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    Marco

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    David Justice

    Thank you Marco!

    So if I am shooting in RAW with a good lens, and I apply the Chromatic Aberration Reduction am I at best, kind of wasting my time, and potentially also loosing a small but significant (noticeable?) amount of information from the RAW file as it converts to TIFF?

    I appreciate your time and knowledge.

    Best Wishes,

    David

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    Marco Marrocco

    Hi David, you're welcome,

    If you're shooting RAW with a good lens, and you are able to step down the aperture so you're affectively shooting at the lens' sweet spot, then turning off the CA correction in Aurora will likely save you some processing time with little to no visible difference and you'll get to keep all the details in the RAW image intact for further refinement.

    The loss of information I was talking about comes into play if you pre-correct your RAW images in an external dedicated software and load them into Aurora as TIFFs; but then again, if you shoot in brackets of five or more exposures like me, you're probably already feeding Aurora more than it needs to do a good job; this way, however, I feel like I can have more control on how chromatic aberrations (and distortion, if applicable) are handled - as opposed to just the on/off option in Aurora.

    So in short: it's great to have a built-in CA correction, but it is also great to be able to turn it off at will, if a particular combination of lens+lighting conditions requires me to do some pre-processing in order not to have to fix things afterwards.

    Just my 2 cents, all the best!

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    Marco

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