JPG files with 100% Quality are to big

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    Austin Miller

    Hello Chris.

    Please note that the size of the exported image depends on how many edits you've applied.

    Could you please try applying one edit and export the picture? What is the size of it?

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    Chris W

    Hello, after I opened the same output file with 9.7 MB in luminar 4 and only slightly increased the brightness and then saved this file with 100% quality, it is only 15.9 MB in size when I set the shadow to minus Set 100 and save again to 100% quality, the file will be larger than 16.1 MB. I can understand that somewhere, as the contrast and thus the complexity of the file increases. But generating 50% more data volume from a 9.7 MB file that has already been saved with lightroom in maximum quality, just because I make the file a bit lighter is unfortunately not acceptable. If I open the 16.1 MB file in Photoshop and export it in maximum quality without having changed anything, the file is only 12 MB in size, if I open the same file in Apple Preview and export it with maximum quality I also get one 16.1 MB file, that means that Adobe has a better compression algorithm than Apple and Skylum. maybe you can still work on it ?! Chris

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    TristanBM

    Hello, 

    I will try, even if nobody replied Chris.

    I have the same problem.

    For example export LR to a jpg = 3.7mo
    Same file import in Luminar AI, just one light edit (Skin smoothing, amount 58), jpg export Quality 100% = 13.3mo...

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    Katherine Nelson

    Hi TristanBM,

    Could you specify if the size changes when you set the quality to 85%?

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    TristanBM

    Hi Katherine, 

    Lightroom export 100% quality = 10.7 MB

    Editing in Luminar AI = Skin smoothing, amount 58

    Export Luminar (no sharpening, no resize, color space sRGB, format JPEG) = 

    100% = 18.7 MB
    99% = 18.7 MB
    98% = 7.3 MB
    85% = 6.1 MB

    So at 100 et 99% the size is almost the double than the export from LR, but at 98% it's (suddenly) around a third less than the original 10.7, and what a big gap from 99% to 98%.

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    Anastasiia Moore

    Hi TristanBM,

    We need to be able to reproduce the issue on our end in order to understand at which point it occurs. Please send us the original file you're working with.

    Here's how you can send us the file:

    1. Visit https://wetransfer.com/
    2. If it's your first time visiting this website, it might ask you to purchase a subscription. Simply select to proceed with the free version.
    3. Click Add your files.
    4. Select the file(s) on your computer.
    5. After you see all the files you need to send appear in the list, click the icon to the left of the Transfer button (the icon looks like a circle with three dots in it).
    6. In Send As select Link.
    7. Click Transfer.
    8. After the files have finished uploading, click Copy Link and paste it into your support request at https://skylum.com/support 

    Looking forward to hearing back from you. 

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    TristanBM

    I'm copyng the link here

    https://we.tl/t-fb8qhQ2S9n

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    TristanBM

    Hello.

    Any answer?

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    Alina Skylum

    Hi TristanBM,

    Our technical department is currently investigating this case.

    We'll get back to you via email as soon as we have more information about this.

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    TristanBM

    Hello, 

    2 months after I come back here as I never received any news, any email.

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    Helga Rowles

    Hi Tristan,

    I'm sorry! We will be sure to look into this asap and get back to you via email.

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    Ralf E. Nyman

    So what might be the reason/solution?
    I've recently started to test AI and have problems with huge file sizes. What about NEO?

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    Kate Williams

    Hi,

    JPEG is a compressed file format. When you open a JPEG image, it is processed by the software, and its size gets larger even when no edits are applied.

     

    When you export an image at 100% quality, it doesn't mean that the image size will coincide with the original size. It does not mean that the file will be exported as the original. It means that our compression algorithm will use compression with minimal loss.

     

    The higher the quality, the larger the file size on export, and it is normal that at high quality.

    Even an image that was not edited can be larger than the original as the algorithm processes each pixel with its subsequent change.

    This story is common to all image editors that can export to JPEG. Some programs can export files without changing their size when no edits were applied, i.e. no compression is applied to the file and the file may remain the same size or very close to the original. 

    However, JPEG compression algorithm is not strictly regulated. Each software can do it a little differently. Therefore, it shouldn't be expected that two different programs will give the same result when image quality is set to maximum in export settings.

    Below are a couple of examples based on our tutorial image.

    Here you can see that the image that was exported with maximum quality from Luminar Neo weighs more than its original. I didn't apply any edits to the photo.

    The same happens in Photoshop. The difference in size is smaller there, but it exists.

    Therefore, it should be expected that in Luminar Neo, the image size gets larger after the export of a JPEG image at 100% quality. 

    If you want to keep a constant file size, choose a lower JPG quality setting in the Export window.

     

    The Quality slider in the Export window is a slider setting that will affect overall compression and the file size. As you're decreasing the slider, the image gets more compressed which may result in the apparent quality loss which depends on the value you choose.

    The quality level one should choose when exporting an image to JPEG is highly dependent upon the kind of detail contained within the image. An image of a smooth blue sky or a sunset sky with large areas of the orange gradient should probably use a high-quality setting. An image that contains nothing but complex detail can get away with lower quality settings. There is no single "best" JPEG compression setting, and depending on the type and complexity of detail (or lack of complexity and detail), you may find yourself using 40-60, 70-80, or 90-100 as appropriate for the photo(s) you are exporting.
    Additionally, the Quality setting depends on the medium you're working with. For example, if you plan to use your JPEGs for web pages, decreasing the quality slider is the way to go. 

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