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    Denis Kotsee

    Hi Egidio,

    in the not-so-distant future, no, sorry.

    Who knows though what's going to happen in a distant future.

     
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    Sherwood Botsford

    This would be a very bad distraction.  Chromebooks represent something like 2-3% of the the computer market, a tiny fraction of the iPad market, and even the iPad market is a bad idea.

    Porting to new hardware is very possible, but to do so transparently is difficult:

     

    Different Processor.

    This is the easiest case.  Usually the manufacturer of the processor makes a compiler to go with it.

     

    Different operating system.

    The OS provides certain basic functions:  How to write a file, how to put a pixel on the screen.  How to store a number, or a piece of text.

    To port to a different OS, you usually have to write a single library that interposes itself between your program and the OS.  But consider:  "/" is a valid character in Windows file names, but not in Mac.  Each OS has oddities that don't translate well.

     

    Different user interfaces.  

    How do you do "double click" or "click and drag" on a touch screen?  Or mouse hover?  What's the equivalent of a two finger pinch on a machine with keyboard and mouse?

    Most desktop apps have a menu bar across the top.  Touch screens don't usually ahve that.

     

    Here's a way to appreciate the differences:  Use Google Calendar on a desktop, on an iPad, and on an iPhone.  Calendar is a simple applicaiton, right?   Yet google has an entirely different user interface and different defaults on each device.  Drives. Me. Crazy.

    Tablets are not intended for serious data creation.  They are designed for data consumption.  We have two ipads in our house.  Primary uses:  Web surfing.  Checking calendar.  Checking email.  Solitaire.  If I have to write more than a paragraph in response to an email, I go to my desktop.

    I have a simple answer to the people who say they need state of the art photo editing on toy computers:  Shoot it right the first time.

     

     

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    Egidio Leitao

    Denis, thank you for your kind reply. Knowing that Skylum very recently released its products for Windows, I was just curious if other platforms were in the horizon. Your answer was right on target.

    Skylum makes excellent products to help edit and tweak images we create. Hardly anything we see online these days is SOOC, It's not a matter of shooting it right the first time, but rather using technology to add to our creativity. I was on the road for a month and had to rely on two other different software apps to do what I normally do with Skylum products. Thanks again, Denis.

    Egídio

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    Denis Kotsee

    You're very welcome, Egídio, thank you very much for understanding our current priorities.

    Before we even consider moving to other platforms we have to make sure we've got everything running smoothly on the ones we've already taken up, so from this standpoint (at least now) it won't make much sense to develop for mobile or for anything else, honestly, while there's still a ton of work to be done in order to bring Mac and Windows versions to parity.

     
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