Sky replacement issue

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    Ralph Bley

    I have the same scenario when replacing a light sky with a dark sky in a typical cityscape - there is a halo around the foreground subject.  It seems to be too much feathering of the replacement sky.  I tried several of the sliders and was not able to make it acceptable to me.  Other replacements are great, but it seems to struggle with the dark replacement cloudy skies.

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    Lynne Pariseau

    wow that's a lot of work for something that is supposed to be automatic - LOL. glad it worked for you!

     

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    Jeremy Alderton

    That results in the sky being in the wrong orientation, although I will admit that it did a better job of recognising the building.  Since I posted I've noticed it doesn't work well with portraits either.  I think you're right... it's not something they anticipated, so any image with strong vertical elements isn't a good candidate for the sky replacement tool. Even pictures of skyscrapers, which they showed in the teaser videos, have a faint pale glow on the sky side. 

    Either I'm missing something in the settings (and I've adjusted EVERYTHING!) or this tool is best restricted to landscapes. Really cool what it can do, but not the answer for everything.

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    Jeremy Alderton

    It is, isn't it. I'm hoping someone from Skylum will sympathise and fix it. 🤞

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    Bob Shrader

    The very tall column into the open sky is unusual, and perhaps a situation the engineers did not envision when writing the code. Did you experiment with rotating the image 90-degrees and then applying the sky replacement in Luminar 4? Would be interesting to know if this made any difference.

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    Vita Bergman

    Hi Jeremy! 

    The pictures look absolutely great!

    Could you please specify what is the format of the source photo? 

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    Jeremy Alderton

    Vita, the original image I was working on was a TIF file.

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    Jeremy Alderton

    And a workaround that works if your sky, like mine, is consistent.  Also works with any sky if you're willing to put in the effort.  You need to use Photoshop for this.

    1. Select the sky, invert the selection... Select/Inverse, and save the selection.. Select/Save Selection.  Rename it "Sky Mask". Press CTRL-D to remove your active selection
    2. Enter Luminar 4 and pick your sky.  Under Advance choose Sky Exposure and brighten the sky to the point that you can't see the haloing.  Click apply to return to Photoshop
    3. In Photoshop create a curves adjustment layer.  Adjust until your sky looks the way you want - don't worry about the rest of your image, just the sky.  Load your selection from step one... Select/Load Selection.  In the dialog box, choose Channel and click on Sky Mask then OK
    4. Select the mask for the adjustment layer (left click on it)
    5. Press D to set default Background/Foreground colours then press CTRL-Backspace to fill in the curves adjustment layer.  Looking at the mask, the sky will be white, everything else black. Press CTRL-D to remove the active mask.

    Hope this helps.  If you need any clarification please let me know.  :)

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    Angela Andrieux

    Hi Jeremy,

    Did you work with the Sky Global and Sky Local sliders? If not, they could prove quite useful in this situation.

    If they didn't help, then please reach out to www.skylum.com/support so our developers can take a closer look. Thanks in advance!

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    Bob Shrader

    More experimentation with this issue: An HDR image produced from a single raw with one of the skies accompanying L4 produced a halo along some vertical edges. The same raw rendered as a normal image with the same sky replacement looked great. So, it appears extreme contrast differences between the base image and the sky image may be a factor in this problem.

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